8 Simple Ways to Improve Your Client Communication

Anna Medvedeva 6 min read

Talking with clients involves many variables like business, money, strategy, and of course the project itself. But no matter how good your code quality or analysis, the client will always remember how well you communicated.

Communication itself is an intricate jigsaw puzzle incorporating psychology and “soft skills” that can tease out what the client really wants – without the client knowing what they really want. Only through this type of “proactive communication” can you achieve the optimal results for you and your clients.

At JetBridge (and hopefully your work environment as well) we’re encouraged to speak up and challenge our clients if we disagree with the best manner of executing the project’s goal. This requires diplomacy and the courage to vocalize your opinions and ideas. Or as our CEO John often says, “Stand up for yourself. Speak up. Speak out.”

So I wanted to share what I now understand as some simple tricks and tips that help international software developers look and sound more professional.

1. Where to talk: Make sure it’s easy for the client to communicate.

 Do: Send a letter where you ask which way/platform is most suitable for the client to use in order to connect with you. If you are suggesting any platform the client doesn’t have any experience with, make a small tutorial/call/text that explains how to use it and its benefits.

 Don’t

  • Be silent and wait for the client to suggest something.
  • Send an invitation to any platform without making sure the client knows how to use it.
  • Be afraid to make better suggestions that may improve communication with the client.

Tips:

  • Always be available, reply to your emails within one day, answer any calls/messages from the client, even on weekends. Just a simple reply where you schedule a call on workdays will do.

2. Understand your audience:

Do: Make sure you talk the way your client understands. Talk with data, prepare analogies, and try to adapt what you are trying to say into something the client will understand. 

Don’t

  • Overload the client with too many technical terms if they’re non-technical.
  • Deep dive into a very isolated and narrow technical part, not thinking what is most important for the client to hear.

Tips: 

  • If the client doesn’t have any prior technical background, use common words to explain technical jargon. (e.g. use ‘system’ instead of ‘back-end’, ‘website’/‘app’ instead of ‘front-end’, etc.)
  • If the information you’re trying to explain is still too hard to translate, try to help the client understand the underlying technical information in broad strokes (at a “10,000 foot level”).

3. Prepare for the meeting:

Do: Prepare a small list of talking points and issues before the meeting. If there will be several other attendees, research, and prepare who they are and what role they play in the client’s company.

Don’t:

  • Be late.
  • Be unprepared and puzzled with the topics discussed.
  • Wait for the client to discuss all the points needed.
  • Have a clear agenda for the call.

Tips: 

  • Know if the meeting will require a video. Prepare any needed programs/apps beforehand so you can instantly access it if the call requires sharing your screen.
  • Check and test beforehand whether your audio, video works properly.
  • If you don’t know the answer you can say you will check in with the rest of the team and follow up.
  • Have a “green screen” virtual background using tools like Zoom or be in a room where there is little background noise and what’s behind you isn’t dirty laundry. 

4. Discuss everything, don’t assume. 

Do: Double-check what the client asked to do before you start because you may have different views of the subject. It helps to eliminate any misunderstandings and wasted time/money.

Don’t

  • Stay silent and be afraid to ask sometimes even obvious questions. 

Tips: 

  • Answer all questions. It may sound too simple, but double-check that all the client’s questions have answers and you missed no important points. Read and check every email or message that was sent.
  • Don’t be afraid to suggest something better for the client. Starting from part of a feature, UI design, or a way to do something. 

5. Rough estimations: Make assurances, but no promises.

 Do: Make sure the client knows that the estimate is very rough and may change. If you’re not comfortable and hesitant to answer, tell that to the client and explain your reasoning. You also can ask for more time to answer. Don’t be afraid to “push back” on the client if it’s her or his fault that the project is being delayed!

 Don’t:

  • Be afraid to say it may take more time than expected.
  • Promise an exact date and time when it will be delivered; it will be misleading if you don’t meet your deadlines and may lower the quality of delivery.

 Tips: 

  • If you need to do more research or you’re waiting to meet some requirements, you can tell the client how long it will take.

6. Status update: Be proactive and reasonably overcommunicate

 Do: Make sure the client knows the status of the projects at least once a week. Inform about extra added features, testing status, and any upcoming changes. The client should be comfortable with the amount of information they get.

 Don’t:

  • Stay silent and make the client call/write you asking about the status repeatedly.
  • Bombard the client with information overload. 

Tips:

  • It all depends on the project of course, but generally do not update the client more than 2-3 times a week. 

7. Delivering (parts/features): find the best way to show and explain the additional feature that you recently delivered.

 Do: Send a small screen recording showing how the feature can be used and where to find it. Or make an appropriate explanation by text or using screenshots. The key point is to make a simple but useful guide for the client to see the feature and the progress. Eliminate any guessing part from the client-side.

 Don’t:

  • Hide it, or think the client will instantly see the difference with the recent update. 

 Tips:

  • Understand your audience and double-check that the explanation is easy to understand for the person with no tech background.

8. Feedback: get feedback from the client as soon as possible. It will reduce the time between feature delivery and overall development.

 Do: Ask the client to review the added feature as soon as it’s delivered. Comment on how they can test it and where to find it. It should be easy for the client to see and understand what they should test. Demand that the client also help in the user testing!

Don’t:

  • Deliver features silently and make it pile up.
  • Make empty promises to “punt” the hard discussions until next week.

Tips: 

  • Encourage more questions and discuss any parts you’re not sure about.
  • Save and document everything the client said, it will help to track your progress, plan any features that you discussed, and not forget anything.
  • Make sure you address the feedback, and the client didn’t repeat any negative feedback repeatedly.
  • Clients shouldn’t be searching for the updates by themselves. Make sure they know what to expect.

Perfecting both listening and speaking skills, fully understanding the intricacies of customer business, brand communication strategies, and its target audience will ultimately lead to success. I might say that every project, as well as a customer, is truly unique but the framework listed with 8 simple steps can perform miracles – not just for your client but for your career.

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